Did you know?

You can donate in lots of different ways to support the long-term conservation of Wisconsin's amazing birds and habitats. Gifts of stock and IRA distributions are just a couple of the options that you have.
 

Give a Gift of stock

  The rising sun marks the start of another beautiful day at Goose Pond. Photo by Curt Caslavka. 

The rising sun marks the start of another beautiful day at Goose Pond. Photo by Curt Caslavka. 

Madison Audubon is pleased to accept your gifts of stock. Per our current financial practices, we will instruct our broker to sell your donated shares upon receipt of the gift. 

If you would like to donate a gift of stock, you simply need to provide the following information to your broker or financial adviser:

Stockbroker: Morgan Stanley
DTC Number: 0015
Internal Account #: 432-109138
Interested Party A/C #: Madison Audubon Society

 

 

donate from your ira

Congress has re-authorized the provision that allows you to make a distribution from your IRA without incurring tax on the withdrawal. That's great news for folks who want to make a difference for conservation.

A contribution to Madison Audubon:

  The prairies are a sight to behold at Faville Grove Sanctuary. MAS Photo.

The prairies are a sight to behold at Faville Grove Sanctuary. MAS Photo.

  • Is an easy and convenient way to make a gift from one of your major assets, tax-free
  • Can be excluded from your gross income
  • Counts towards your required minimum distribution

For your contribution to qualify:

  • You must be 70 1/2 or older. 
  • The transfer must go directly from your traditional or Roth IRA to Madison Audubon
  • Your total IRA contribution(s) cannot exceed $100,000
  • Your gift must be outright
  • No goods or services may be received for the gift (don't worry - we'll see to that)

Questions? Feel free to contact Matt Reetz, Madison Audubon's executive director, by phone (608-255-2473) or email (mreetz@madisonaudubon.org) to find the right way for you to help us plan for the future.


Banner photo: Dragonfly on purple prairie clover. Photo by Arlene Koziol.