January 2018 Keystone Volunteer: JD Arnston

JD Arnston is Madison Audubon's keystone volunteer this month. He and his little friend, Whisper, a Morepork (native owl to New Zealand), met during a birding trip to New Zealand in 2017. Photo provided by JD Arnston

JD Arnston is Madison Audubon's keystone volunteer this month. He and his little friend, Whisper, a Morepork (native owl to New Zealand), met during a birding trip to New Zealand in 2017. Photo provided by JD Arnston

In December 2016, Madison Audubon received a volunteer interest form from a humble fellow named JD Arnston. JD wrote that he was interested in volunteering at our sanctuaries, or helping with citizen science projects, or maybe with some office work. Little did we know that in the space of just a year, JD would become one of the most dedicated and active volunteers in the entire organization, becoming a staple at Goose Pond Sanctuary and participating in just about every event Madison Audubon puts on!

JD kicked off his relationship with MAS with participating in the winter bluebird surveys for the citizen science program called Climate Watch. He partnered up with a more experienced birder, saying he wanted to learn the ropes. And did he learn! He then moved on to adopt and monitor a trail of songbird nest boxes in the Lapinski-Kitze Prairie at Goose Pond Sanctuary. JD signed up for work days, seed collecting, prairie planting, and he participated in the Madison and Poynette Christmas Bird Counts. He attends our Evenings with Audubon lectures, participated in the Wingspan Dedication, tagged monarchs, and rode his bike around Lake Monona with fellow bird nerds for Birds, Bikes, and Brews. In short, he does it all!

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"I love birds. But working with MAS also gives me the chance to get out of the office and immersed in nature and our community," says JD about why he dedicates so much of his time and talents to Madison Audubon. "There are so many opportunities to not only take part in fun events, but also to learn about our incredible ecosystems of which our birds are a part of."

Because so much of his volunteer time is spent at Goose Pond Sanctuary, JD has become like a family member to resident managers Mark Martin and Sue Foote-Martin and land steward Maddie Dumas. "His hard work and eagerness to learn about restoration, birds, plants and everything in between are inspirational to staff and other volunteers alike," says the Goose Pond staff. "We are so excited to have JD as part of the Goose Pond team!"

"Through volunteering, I've also had the privilege of working with some of the most welcoming, knowledgeable, and dedicated individuals that make up Madison Audubon and its members," JD says. To say the feeling is mutual is an understatement.

One of JD's stunning photos of birds he saw in New Zealand in 2017 during a birding trip of a lifetime! This bird is a Tui, an endemic species to New Zealand. Photo by JD Arnston

One of JD's stunning photos of birds he saw in New Zealand in 2017 during a birding trip of a lifetime! This bird is a Tui, an endemic species to New Zealand. Photo by JD Arnston

On top of his full-time job and spending what seems like every extra minute counting birds, collecting seeds, or learning about the local environment, JD also completed the Wisconsin Master Naturalist course this past summer and recently returned from a trip to New Zealand where he continued to expand his curiosity and understanding of birds and their ecosystems.

Thank you, JD, for being an awesome person in your own right, as well as a keystone volunteer for Madison Audubon! We truly appreciate your time, talents, energy, and enthusiasm!

To learn how you can volunteer with Madison Audubon, visit our volunteer page.

Written by Brenna Marsicek, Director of Communications

Winter Update at Faville Grove

Sunset on the Laas land, Faville Grove Sanctuary. Photo by Drew Harry

Sunset on the Laas land, Faville Grove Sanctuary. Photo by Drew Harry

It's been a busy time here at Faville Grove, as always. We finished collecting seed in November, with over 300 species collected! On November 25th we burned 110+ acres on Martin and Tillotson prairies; a very successful burn. With the help with lots of volunteers, we mixed the seed into dry-mesic, wet, wet-mesic, and woodland/savanna mixes. The day before planting we conducted a good burn on the woods north of Hwy 89. And on December 2nd we planted 22.75 acres, a huge undertaking with about 50 volunteers, on a gorgeous and sunny day.

David Musolf and Roger Packard (Faville Grove Sanctuary resident managers) brought in the New Year with one brave guest on the morning's hike (-15 degrees), while I was in Miami at Everglades National Park.

I'm thankful to you, all of our volunteers, who helped make 2017 a success.

This winter, we'll be hosting brush cutting work parties every Wednesday through February from 9am-noon. There will also be parties 9-noon on Saturdays: January 13, 20 and February 3, 10.

A view of the savanna above the pond where extensive cutting has taken place. Photo by Drew Harry

A view of the savanna above the pond where extensive cutting has taken place. Photo by Drew Harry

We'll meet at Buddy's place (N7710 Highway 89, Waterloo) and go from there. You can contact me beforehand to make sure we're going out, but it's not necessary. We've been cutting on the former Laas property, working around a small wooded area rimming the pond. We'll have a burn pile going each day for respite from the cold. It's been great progress, and every day has been rewarding to open up the vistas.

Join us out here!

Written by Drew Harry, Faville Grove Sanctuary land steward

Deck the Halls with Bird Counters

Holiday birders are searching for feathered friends on Lake Mendota during the 2017 Christmas Bird Count. Photo by Carolyn Byers.

Holiday birders are searching for feathered friends on Lake Mendota during the 2017 Christmas Bird Count. Photo by Carolyn Byers.

The 118th Christmas Bird Count period is officially over, and the Madison CBC data has been submitted! Huzzah and thank goodness! It was an awesome year in many ways: over 100 participants, a record 97 species observed (previous record was 95 in 1997 and 1998), 60,151 individual birds counted, 9 species high-counts, and some cool and unusual birds for this time of year (like an ovenbird and Iceland gull!).

Christmas Bird Count is not for the weak of heart. It takes place in the dead of winter, and requires an extraordinary attention span. It looks a little like 17 layers of the warmest long-johns and balaclavas you own to achieve as little skin exposed as possible, and forget about hot cocoa that is just a distraction, but wait I'm freezing while standing around waiting for birds to grace us with their tiny, fluffy presence, oh there goes another robin, whoop-dee-do, let's try a new spot, no wait, what's that, OH MY GOODNESS IT'S AN EASTERN PHOEBE, WHAT IS THAT DOING HERE! Did you mark that down? Are we sure? Ok mark it down. That was cool. Now what else is out there...? My binoculars are frozen to my eye sockets.

Triumph is just one of the emotions a Christmas Bird Counter feels when reviewing the tally list at the end of the day. Photo by Carolyn Byers

Triumph is just one of the emotions a Christmas Bird Counter feels when reviewing the tally list at the end of the day. Photo by Carolyn Byers

But boy, is it fun. It consists of the perfect stew of birds, bird nerds, and the challenge to overcome the conditions. And at the end of the day, when we sit around a table and eat chili and slowly start to thaw out, it's smiles all around.

The goal of Christmas Bird Count is to tally as many species of birds on one single day as possible to get a snapshot of bird diversity and abundance across the US, Canada, and many other countries in the western hemisphere. To participate you have to join a "circle" -- basically a group of folks who are signed up to survey an area. There are hundreds of circles that survey their area and turn in data, and this century-old activity makes up the longest-running formally organized citizen science program ever. The Madison CBC has been running for 68 years now, and some of the participants have been involved for 30 years or longer!

The recent Madison-area CBC took place on December 16, 2017. We have 23 areas within our circle, and over 100 people joined the count! We a had record-breaking total of 97 species detected on that one day, and high-counts for nine species: greater white-fronted goose, Canada goose -- by about 10,000!, tundra swans, belted king-fisher, red-bellied woodpecker, downy woodpecker, hairy woodpecker, Eastern phoebe, and white-crowned sparrow. And, as I mentioned, the ovenbird and the Iceland gull were cool finds too. The list of species and counts is below.

The date is set for 2018: Saturday, December 15. Mark you calendars if you'd like to participate, and watch for an email in November about the event!

Written by Brenna Marsicek, Communications Director

Day-of Species:
Greater white-fronted goose: 4
Cackling goose: 8
Canada goose: 25,046
Trumpeter swan: 2
Tundra swan: 3,555
Wood Duck: 4
Gadwall: 156
American black duck: 117
Mallard: 3,239
Northern shoveler: 596
Northern pintail: 4
Green-winged teal: 12
Canvasback: 313
Redhead: 21
Ring-necked duck: 47
Lesser scaup: 355
Long-tailed duck: 1
Bufflehead: 417
Common goldeneye: 798
Hooded merganser: 34
Common merganser: 2,540
Ruddy duck: 5
Ring-necked Pheasant: 5
Wild turkey: 173
Common loon: 7
Pied-billed grebe: 4
Great blue heron: 2
Bald eagle: 44
Northern harrier: 6
Sharp-shinned hawk: 6
Cooper’s hawk: 31
Red-shouldered hawk: 2
Red-tailed hawk: 137
Rough-legged hawk: 3
American coot: 1,398
Sandhill crane: 197
Ring-billed gull: 768
Herring gull: 1,426
Iceland gull: 1
Rock pigeon: 440
Mourning dove: 580
Eastern screech owl: 10
Great horned owl: 25
Barred owl: 4
Northern saw-whet owl: 1
Belted kingfisher: 14
Red-headed woodpecker: 2
Red-bellied woodpecker: 362
Yellow-bellied sapsucker: 4
Downy woodpecker: 412
Hairy woodpecker: 148
Northern flicker: 23
Pileated woodpecker: 1
Eastern phoebe: 2
American kestrel: 3
Merlin: 5
Northern shrike: 5
Blue jay: 494
American crow: 844
Horned lark: 24
Black-capped chickadee: 1,520
Tufted titmouse: 59
Red-breasted nuthatch: 52
White-breasted nuthatch: 478
Brown creeper: 57
Carolina wren: 3
Winter wren: 8
Golden-crowned kinglet: 26
Eastern bluebird: 7
Hermit thrush: 1
American robin: 216
Gray catbird: 1
European Starling: 4,895
Cedar waxwing: 295
Lapland longspur: 1
Snow bunting: 1
Ovenbird: 1
Yellow-rumped warbler: 1
Eastern towhee: 1
American tree sparrow: 652
Fox sparrow: 3
Song sparrow: 31
Lincoln’s sparrow: 1
Swamp sparrow: 12
White-throated sparrow: 37
White-crowned sparrow: 8
Dark-eyed junco: 1,434
Northern cardinal: 748
Red-winged blackbird: 68
Common grackle: 46
House finch: 913
Red crossbill: 1
White-winged crossbill: 2
Common redpoll: 1
Pine siskin: 558
American goldfinch: 768
House sparrow: 2,358

Count week species (those seen 3 days before or after the count, but not the day of):
Snow goose
White-winged scoter
Glaucous gull
Snowy owl
Peregrine falcon
Townsend’s solitaire
Clay-colored sparrow
Rusty blackbird
Purple finch

 

Canada geese and tundra swans were at an all-time high for the Madison CBC this year. Photo by Monica Hall

Canada geese and tundra swans were at an all-time high for the Madison CBC this year. Photo by Monica Hall

From the Educators: Vera Court Creates a Field Guide

Vera kiddos are ready for a bug safari! MAS Photo

Vera kiddos are ready for a bug safari! MAS Photo

The elementary school kids at Vera Court Neighborhood Center are excited about a brand-new project they’re working on- their very own Field Guide! This semester they’re building their literacy and art skills by creating pages for their field guide. Each week the kids head off to a new park with a MAS educator and focus on exploring different subjects like birds, mammals, plants, and macroinvertibrates. They keep a careful list of everything they encounter, and the following week each student selects one organism to enter into their field guide.

Insect week was particularly exciting: the kids love bug safaris! No log was left unturned (except for the really big ones, that is) and they found slugs and roly-polys galore. There’s just something about peering down at a tiny bug through a magnifying glass that excites all kids – and some adults who are kids-at-heart too! 

An American crow drawn by Vera Court kiddos for their field guide.

An American crow drawn by Vera Court kiddos for their field guide.

A mallard duck drawn by Vera Court kiddos for their field guide.  

A mallard duck drawn by Vera Court kiddos for their field guide.
 

Reading and writing are important skills for all children to master, and both Vera Court and Madison Audubon work hard to support them in this endeavor. Many of these kids are bilingual (something most adults can't boast!) and may not get much practice speaking English at home. This field guide helps kids hone their writing skills when they think they're just having fun hanging out with their friends in nature.

This work was made possible by you! Thank you for helping Madison Audubon Society connect with kids and nature!

Written by Carolyn Byers, Director of Education

Goose Pond is a Prairie Pothole

Goose Pond is bumper-to-bumper waterfowl. Photo by Arlene Koziol

Goose Pond is bumper-to-bumper waterfowl. Photo by Arlene Koziol

Goose Pond is a prairie pothole, one of the most threatened types of wetlands in the world and a mecca for wildlife. These potholes were formed by chunks of glaciers breaking off and compressing the ground underneath while very slowly melting. Now, thousands of years later, these ponds are filled and refilled each year by rain, snowmelt, and run-off from surrounding land. These shallow wetlands provide abundant nourishment for many levels of the food chain, from plants to insects, small mammals and amphibians to waterfowl (migratory and resident). They’re biodiversity hotspots.

They’re also in danger of destruction in Wisconsin. These shallow ponds with fluctuating water levels fall under the "non-federal" or “isolated" wetlands category. Current proposed legislation seeks to eliminate any permitting or oversight by agencies like the WDNR and would allow developers to destroy and build over these wildlife havens.

Sandhill cranes use prairie potholes like Goose Pond for nourishment and rest. Photo by Arlene Koziol

Sandhill cranes use prairie potholes like Goose Pond for nourishment and rest. Photo by Arlene Koziol

They say Wisconsin is only one of a handful of states that protects isolated wetlands. But 20% (!!) of Wisconsin’s wetlands, including Goose Pond, fall into this category. That is A LOT of wetlands! They say this legislation will be good for business. But at what expense, and on what timeframe? Destroying the resources that support the natural environment for short-term gain is beyond short-sighted; it’s selfish. They say this will actually be good for the environment by allowing taxpayer dollars to be redirected to protecting higher quality wetlands. But you only need five minutes at a place like Goose Pond to know that this place has extraordinary value to biodiversity, as well as the people who appreciate it.

Fortunately, because of over 6 decades of Madison Audubon’s members’ and donors’ efforts and generosity, Goose Pond is safe. It is under MAS ownership, under a conservation easement, and under the protective wing of every nature nut who has laid eyes on it.

But not every isolated wetland is so lucky. You can make a difference. Contact your legislators. Post about your favorite isolated wetland in Wisconsin, and ask your friends to get involved. Reject the spin that makes it all sound fine. Take a stand for the long-view.

What wetland is special to you? Photo by Arlene Koziol

What wetland is special to you? Photo by Arlene Koziol

Written by Brenna Marsicek, Madison Audubon communications director

From the Educators: Fall is in the air, and kids are outside learning

Vera kids use a field guide to identify birds seen at Governor's Island. MAS Photo

Vera kids use a field guide to identify birds seen at Governor's Island. MAS Photo

Last summer Our summer educator, Olivia Sanderfoot, reached over 300 kids with our outdoor education programming! Wow! Many of those kids met weekly with Olivia, and were able to benefit from repeat visits and lesson content that built as time progressed.

This fall we are once again partnering with Vera Court, Bayview, and Salvation Army community centers. They’re all doing awesome things, but we’re particularly excited about our lessons with Salvation Army: the older elementary school students are mentoring the younger as everyone explores local parks. We’re hoping the older kids grow and shine with the added responsibility. At the very least, they’re excited about their new roles!

Our new intern, Bryce Lackey, is off to a great start: he will be leading programming at Bayview and Salvation Army community centers, as well as helping out with in-school visits.

Our school partnerships are really taking off: MAS educators continue to meet weekly with Lincoln Elementary, where one of our favorite activities is walking to Wingra Creek to make observations about phenology- the seasonal changes in nature.

Students at Lincoln Elementary work together to build their own honeycomb. They learned a lot about hive geometry! MAS Photo

Students at Lincoln Elementary work together to build their own honeycomb. They learned a lot about hive geometry! MAS Photo

We are also visiting Muir Elementary, where we explore outside with their 2nd grade students.  On my first day with the kids, they came back inside from lunchtime recess yelling “we saw a hawk eating a bunny and it’s outside NOW!” They were so excited to share their sighting with me, and to learn more about predator-prey dynamics.

This work was made possible by you! Thank you for helping Madison Audubon Society connect kids with nature!

Strange Butterflies Reported at Goose Pond Sanctuary

Monarch tagging is underway at Goose Pond Sanctuary, with sessions happening on September 9 and 16. Nearly 100 monarchs were tagged on the 9th, but in the morning session, the strangest species of butterflies appeared...

She might look innocent, but she has her eye on something.... (Maddie Dumas, Goose Pond Sanctuary land manager, and Jim Otto, MAS volunteer). Photo by Arlene Koziol

She might look innocent, but she has her eye on something.... (Maddie Dumas, Goose Pond Sanctuary land manager, and Jim Otto, MAS volunteer). Photo by Arlene Koziol

A rare Danaus plexippus gigantus maddius was captured at Madison Audubon Goose Pond Sanctuary. Fortunately master butterfly scooper Jim Otto spotted the maddius. He approached it slowly, gave a war cry, then swept the net forward quickly and captured the maddius before it landed on the terrified Everett Reetz.

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The maddius is a species of special concern in Wisconsin and has never been sited in Columbia County. [Story by Arlene Koziol]

Then, imagine our surprise when in the afternoon session, these incredible specimens fluttered out to the prairie!

Giant monarch twins feasting on showy goldenrod. Photo by Mark Martin

Giant monarch twins feasting on showy goldenrod. Photo by Mark Martin

Monarchs seem to be getting larger to cope with climate change. Twin female monarchs (Danaus plexippus gigantus) visited Goose Pond Sanctuary Saturday afternoon September 9th on their migration to Mexico.

Mark was lucky to photograph a monarch releasing a monarch (probably should be submitted to the Guinness book of World Records). 

Photo by Mark Martin

Photo by Mark Martin

He also found the monarchs nectaring on showy goldenrod just before Sharon Brancel tried to net them. When we attempted to tag them, we learned they had already been tagged at birth, and were named Lisa Vetter Boyd and Heidi Vetter. [Story by Mark Martin and Susan Foote-Martin]

Photo by Mark Martin

Photo by Mark Martin

Kestrel nesting results are in!

A young kestrel awaiting its turn on the scale. MAS Photo

A young kestrel awaiting its turn on the scale. MAS Photo

Every bird lover has a favorite birding memory. What's yours? Too hard to choose? I agree: mine is tied between an awesome loon concert in the Chequamegon National Forest, and one involving baby birds. I'll tell you about the loons a different day. But first:

This past June, many of our members took the opportunity to join Madison Audubon and leaders of the Central Wisconsin Kestrel Research program for what might have been the greatest birding activity ever: banding baby kestrels.

As a rookie birder myself, I shared in this new experience with eyes as big as saucers and heart fluttering in excitement. This wasn't looking at pretty birds in the distance through binoculars. This was holding fluffy little handfuls of unrealized might who inspired feelings of awe, respect, and even maternal adoration. This was watching professional biologists carefully handle fragile wings and legs as they took measurements and placed metal bands around the chicks' ankles, and getting to ask 100 questions about who, what, when, where, and why. This was getting a first-hand look at how kestrel boxes are made and where they are placed, and learning about the decline and rebound of these tiny falcons.

If you can't tell, it was a great day.

Janet Eschenbauch of the Central Wisconsin Kestrel Research program (on ladder), Brand Smith (white), and Jim Shurts (blue) retrieve kestrel chicks from one of the nest boxes monitored through Madison Audubon. MAS Photo

Janet Eschenbauch of the Central Wisconsin Kestrel Research program (on ladder), Brand Smith (white), and Jim Shurts (blue) retrieve kestrel chicks from one of the nest boxes monitored through Madison Audubon. MAS Photo

That great day is owed largely to Brand Smith, volunteer kestrel box coordinator and former Madison Audubon president. Since 2009 and with support from Madison Audubon, Brand has spearheaded the effort to construct and put up kestrel nest boxes in south-central Wisconsin, and coordinate dozens of volunteers who check what's happening in the nests. Kestrels would naturally nest in cavities in old snags, but cultural practices result in very few standing dead trees in the landscape. So they rely on help from people to find nesting sites.

The program started with an ambitious 33 nest boxes in 2009 and is now at a dazzling 143 boxes in seven Wisconsin counties in 2017. Volunteers adopt a nest box in the beginning of the year and visit it regularly to track progress of eggs, chicks, and adults. Brand alone monitors nearly half of the boxes and puts in thousands of miles and hours each season to do so. Data collected throughout the nesting season are sent to Wisconsin DNR and others who work with conserving kestrels in Wisconsin.

Now, results of the 2017 year are in! Of the 143 boxes Brand and Madison Audubon placed in the landscape, 56 were occupied, and a whopping 46 produced successful nests (80%!) with an average of 4.6 eggs per nest. Approximately 190 kestrels fledged from these boxes, 102 of which we had banded along with 32 adults in June. Three kestrels that Madison Audubon banded in previous years were recaptured, as well as one kestrel another group banded (meaning that adult established a new territory in our area).

A kestrel chick is weighed, measured, and banded through this program. MAS Photo

A kestrel chick is weighed, measured, and banded through this program. MAS Photo

We'll continue monitoring and banding kestrels, with your help. You can volunteer to monitor a box, join Madison Audubon to get a chance to band kestrel chicks next summer, or donate to Madison Audubon to keep programs like this going.

Thanks for all of your support, and keep your eyes peeled for those little falcons swooping through the prairie or perched on a fence post.

Written by Brenna Marsicek, Madison Audubon Society communications director

Wingspan: Fully funded and foundationally set!

While orange fencing, gray tarps, and bare ground are not the usual view in Bicentennial Prairie, this is a sight made beautiful by what it signifies. Tucked into the hillside overlooking Goose Pond is physical proof that many people know and love this sanctuary and those who tend it, and are creating something special to honor them.

We are delighted to share that nearly 100 donors have helped us reach our fundraising goal of $50,000! Because of all of you, the Wingspan observation pavilion will become a reality and a welcoming place for generations to come. We thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

On site, concrete footings have been poured, and the first of three sets of columns are scheduled for installation this week. The shades are being fabricated as we speak, and the solid oak slabs for the benches are in hand. We are preparing signage, and beginning to plan the dedication ceremony. Even the prairie seems ready, with its incredible show of flowers and abundance of birds and insects.

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Through all of this hustle and bustle, Mark Martin and Susan Foote-Martin continue their dedicated work on the land at Goose Pond Sanctuary. They're graduating interns, controlling invasives, counting butterflies, and conducting outreach. Your support and respect for these humble and wonderful land managers are well founded.

Everyone is welcome to visit the Wingspan site at Goose Pond (follow the path up and to the left of the kiosk), and see the fruits of your generosity.

Sincerely,
The Wingspan Committee

John Kaiser, Galen Hasler, Brenna Marsicek, Roger Packard, Matt Reetz, Don Schmidt, and Topf Wells, in collaboration with Mark Martin and Susan Foote-Martin

From the Rise of Goose Pond

Bicentennial Prairie surrounds the future Wingspan site, and is absolutely stunning right now! Photo by Brenna Marsicek

Bicentennial Prairie surrounds the future Wingspan site, and is absolutely stunning right now! Photo by Brenna Marsicek

The view from Bicentennial Prairie right now is simply glorious. The space for the new Wingspan observation platform has been cleared and leveled, and the prairie is in full bloom in anticipation of its arrival.

This project is a community-spurred effort, initiated by Madison Audubon member John Kaiser, dedicated to Goose Pond Sanctuary land managers Mark and Sue Martin, and funded entirely by those who love and support Goose Pond -- that's YOU and your fellow members! Learn more here.

A preview of what you'll see from the Wingspan platform. Photo by Arlene Koziol

A preview of what you'll see from the Wingspan platform. Photo by Arlene Koziol

Here are a few exciting updates on the Wingspan project. By all means, please come out to Goose Pond and see them for yourself!

  • The footprint for pavilion has been cleared and leveled (see photo below), and the concrete footings will be poured in the next few weeks.
  • Materials for the shades are in hand, and their production is underway.
  • The Prairie Lane road and turn-around will soon be expanded to accommodate Wingspan visitors.
  • Benches have been ordered and will be delivered once the shades are installed.
  • Plans for the dedication ceremony this fall will begin shortly. Stay tuned!
This half-circle scrape is the footprint of the future Wingspan site. More to come soon! MAS Photo

This half-circle scrape is the footprint of the future Wingspan site. More to come soon! MAS Photo

Mark the date: August 15

Donations to Wingspan of any amount are welcome and truly appreciated. All donors are listed on our website and in the newsletter.

Folks giving over $250 will be recognized on a permanent plaque on site. If you'd like your name or the name of someone you'd like to honor to appear on the plaque in time for the dedication ceremony this fall, please donate by August 15. Donations received after that date will be listed on the website and, for donations of $250 or more, on a second plaque installed at a later date.

Thank you for your enthusiasm, support, and vision! We look forward to sharing a splendid view and a long-lasting memory with you at Wingspan soon.